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Howes M.D., PhD., R. (2007). Sleep: An original

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Sleep: An original “radical” proposal

Randolph Michael Howes M.D., PhD.confirmed user (Plastic surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore)

Published in medi.philica.com

Observation
Without sleep, we die and the mystery of sleep has eluded us. Humans must maintain a crucial and continual intake of oxygen. Our bodies primarily heal and fight pathogens and neoplasia oxidatively. Health-beneficial exercise increases our free radical levels 10-15 times and decreases risk of cancer and atherosclerosis. Sleep shifts to a mitochondrial high level (state 4) production of electronically modified oxygen derivatives (EMODs), which I believe is necessary for healing and for protection against bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoans and neoplasia.

Mitochondrial EMOD production is high when availability of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is low. Boveris and Chance determined that the production of H2O2 by isolated mitochondria was maximal when ADP was limited, muscular activity the lowest and the electron carriers were consequently reduced in “state 4” respiration and EMOD production was at its highest (Rolfe et al. 1997).

I believe that, in part, sleep is a time of rejuvenation, which requires high levels of EMODs, according to my Unified Theory of Oxygen Participation in Aerobiosis (UTOPIA Theory-www.thepundit.com). I believe that this is the basis for requiring sleep (rest) during recovery from illness or injury. The evidence that EMOD generation is increased during rest may dictate the need that humans sleep for 1/3 of our lifetimes. Sleeping around seven hours per night appears optimal for health. Lack of sleep doubles the risk of death from heart disease. My proposal represents the biochemical basis for the obligation for sleep. During sleep, relatively high levels of EMODs are produced to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, to oxidatively kill pathogenic organisms, to heal wounds or injury and to maintain a state of health and homeostasis. I believe that sleep may require a relative hypoxia (Schultz et al. 2000), with increased EMOD production, such that it can generate EMODs for purposes of cleansing, repair, and rejuvenation.

Information about this Observation
Peer-review ratings (from 2 reviews, where a score of 100 represents the ‘average’ level):
Originality = 125.00, importance = 150.00, overall quality = 125.00
This Observation was published on 5th October, 2007 at 17:39:19 and has been viewed 7274 times.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 License.
The full citation for this Observation is:
Howes M.D., PhD., R. (2007). Sleep: An original “radical” proposal. PHILICA.COM Observation number 42.


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1 Peer review [reviewer #47336unconfirmed user] added 25th August, 2011 at 08:33:25

This is one of the most interesting articles produced by the author in the form of a concise ‘observation’. Undoubtedly, he makes a point about why humans sleep. But this may be only part of the explanation, because unlike animals, humans have what is called ‘human consciousness’ by psychologists.
1.Does hypoxia induce dreams in humans?
Most animals also sleep, and some hibernate, like bears in winter— when the food is scarce, and are thus able to survive the long winter.
2. How would the author apply his theory to hibernation of bears, and so on? According to his UTOPIA the bears would accumulate high levels of EMODs. The part about the relative hypoxia is somewhat hard to accept; if the hypoxia goes too far organisms that depend on oxygen for survival would dye of deep hypoxia.
3. If bears during their hibernation suffer from some deep hypoxia, how would their neurons survive in a deeply-hypoxic brain? !
4.Any measurements that support the hypoxia part of the theory?
5. Any measurements that support the entire theory about sleeping humans?

Originality: 5, Importance: 6, Overall quality: 5


2 Peer review [reviewer #76713unconfirmed user] added 28th July, 2016 at 02:14:35

This is one of the most interesting articles produced by the author in the form of a concise ‘observation’. Undoubtedly, he makes a point about why humans sleep. But this may be only part of the explanation, because unlike animals, humans have what is called ‘human consciousness’ by psychologists.
1.Does hypoxia induce dreams in humans?
Most animals also sleep, and some hibernate, like bears in winter— when the food is scarce, and are thus able to survive the long winter.
2. How would the author apply his theory to hibernation of bears, and so on? According to his UTOPIA the bears would accumulate high levels of EMODs. The part about the relative hypoxia is somewhat hard to accept; if the hypoxia goes too far organisms that depend on oxygen for survival would dye of deep hypoxia.
3. If bears during their hibernation suffer from some deep hypoxia, how would their neurons survive in a deeply-hypoxic brain? !
4.Any measurements that support the hypoxia part of the theory?
5. Any measurements that support the entire theory about sleeping humans?

Originality: 5, Importance: 6, Overall quality: 5




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