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Denaxas, N. (2017). Christianity, Capitalism and the right to ownership - The commercialization of free goods as defined by Christianity. PHILICA.COM Article number 948.

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Christianity, Capitalism and the right to ownership - The commercialization of free goods as defined by Christianity

Nikolaos Denaxasunconfirmed user (Theology School/Faculty of Pastoral and Social Theology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki)

Published in socio.philica.com

Abstract
In Christian teaching the human value is neither dependent on the external features nor the financial strength or weakness of any man, but on the common human essence , originated from the one and only Father. Saint John Chrysostom separates material goods in free and non-free. As free he defines what was given to man through the creation of the world , only to enjoy them with no limits and terms.

Article body

The very fundamental cosmological setting, is what John Chrysostom sees as a measure of the wisdom of God, perfectly integrated into the eschatological teaching of the Church.

The notion of ownership in capitalism is not found in the effective freedon of a certain right; it is embedded in coercion and deprivation and the  excessive freedom of opportunity. Furthermore, the notion of capitalism has a clear class distiction. The only unambiguous and true reality is the ownership of the means of production which not only is crucially important to the development of the capitalism but also for the expression of its  views.

So, money as a historical subject, as a mean of exchange and as a geneneral commercial equivalent is not all bad. Money beyond their use as means of exchange or payment do not have an individual primary value.

The multiple use of money for individual purposes, the accumulation of it and the illusory glow of bliss and luxury secured by money, lead to the change of the natural balance of the world;the balance that God himself has set as the foundation for its appropriate function. The Church Fathers point out the enormous risk posed to man by accumulating wealth or retain property, whilst stressing the need for them to be managed sensibly.

So, if the free goods (sun, water, air , etc.) are dependent on the merciless rules of the capitalist market, then the economistic and deeply exploitative spirit of capitalism would transform into assets; and given the social conflict, their access would face class obstacles.





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This Article was published on 31st January, 2017 at 22:28:48 and has been viewed 237 times.

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Denaxas, N. (2017). Christianity, Capitalism and the right to ownership - The commercialization of free goods as defined by Christianity. PHILICA.COM Article number 948.


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